Praying for a cure for mom: Why I Walk

By: Michele Devlin  In 2016 at the age of 64, my mom, Debi Turner, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. For years, she’d had some unusual symptoms that I chalked up to stress or being tired. Boy, was I wrong. The most independent, strong woman I knew was starting to fade away. She was so young, and it progressed so fast. I had two moms: the one … Continue reading Praying for a cure for mom: Why I Walk

For Lynne and Grammy Helen: Why I Walk

Lynne Russell was 51 and raising her three sons, one 14-year-old and two 19-year-olds, when she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Her grandma, Helen, passed away from that disease the same year.  Lynne has since retired from her teaching career and lives close to her sons in Seattle in an assisted living community.  Lynne and her parents, Jim and Karen, are captains for the Lynne & … Continue reading For Lynne and Grammy Helen: Why I Walk

Growing up when dad has dementia: Why I Walk

By: Grace Lilje It was in the Spring of 2010 when my dad, my older brother Nolan, and I piled into our car for a road trip that would forever change our lives.  My dad, Bill, who worked as a wheat farmer, had been exhibiting some uncharacteristic behaviors and patterns that my mom had recently noticed. He was having difficulty planning in his job and … Continue reading Growing up when dad has dementia: Why I Walk

Marian and Bunky: Caregiving across the miles

  Growing up, Marian Allen was bright and bubbly. She had a love for Elvis Presley, holding babies and traveling. She went out of her way to introduce herself to people, and was always a big fan of hugs. Marian has Down syndrome, and a few years ago, she was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Her older sister Bunky is her long-distance caregiver. Bunky has lived … Continue reading Marian and Bunky: Caregiving across the miles

The Promise

By Mel Watson, Director, Time Together Adult Day Services, Island Senior Resources How many of us ever plan to be a family caregiver? Do we consider what we might do, if someone close to us needs help to do everyday things? It’s not something most of us think about until we are facing it, head on. Years ago, my mom made me promise never to … Continue reading The Promise

The grief and loss of reciprocity

by Reed Henry, MA, LMHC, gerontologist  I met with a man this morning that had recently experienced the agony of placing his dear sweet wife in a specialized memory care facility. Walter and Emma* have been married 62 wonderful years and he loves her with all of his heart. My last two encounters with him have centered on his unhappiness with the care she has … Continue reading The grief and loss of reciprocity

Contemplative Caregiving: A Q&A with Jonathan Prescott

Jonathan Prescott is the founder of Wise Caregiving, a nonprofit dedicated to helping people become effective, sustainable and empathetic caregivers. Jonathan’s career as a hospice, cancer-care and hospital Chaplain, along with his spiritual practice as an ordained student of Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh, gives him a unique perspective on how to thrive within the helping professions. His trainings help people learn the arts of listening, … Continue reading Contemplative Caregiving: A Q&A with Jonathan Prescott