Powerful Voices Motivate Olympia

Washington State Capitol.  Olympia, WA.

Washington State Capitol. On February 25, 2015, the Alzheimer’s Association hosted its annual Advocacy Day in Olympia, WA. Advocates visited the offices of all 147 legislators to talk about issues affecting those touched by Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

An advocate adjusts his sash before visiting Legislators.  105 people wore Alzheimer's Association sashes and spoke to legislators about the urgency of a several bills that will help those affected by Alzheimer's and other dementias.

An advocate adjusts his sash before visiting Legislators. 105 people wore Alzheimer’s Association sashes and spoke to legislators about the urgency of several bills that will help those affected by Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

2015-2-25 Advocacy Day (146 of 328)

Myriam Marquez welcomes advocates to the Capitol. Myriam was diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer’s. “It’s too late for me,” said Myriam, “but if I’m out there saying we need a cure, it will happen!”

Over 100 people visited Olympia to speak to their legislators about issues affecting those diagnosed with Alzheimer's & other dementias.

105 people visited Olympia to speak to their legislators about issues affecting those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s & other dementias. Advocates learned that their views are valued by elected officials.

Susan Meadows speaks with her team before visiting legislators during Advocacy Day.

Madeleine Fraley speaks with her team before visiting legislators during Advocacy Day. Many elected officials have little understanding of challenges facing those caring for loved ones with dementia.

Joel Loiacono, Executive Director of the Inland Northwest Chapter, speaks to Rep. Joe Schmick during Advocacy Day.

Joel Loiacono, Executive Director of the Inland Northwest Chapter, speaks to Rep. Joe Schmick during Advocacy Day. When Alzheimer’s advocates interact with elected officials they gain support for legislation that helps families through improved services, prevention or research.

Irene crosses the street with her advocacy team during Advocacy Day.  A former physician, Irene now tells her story of being diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer's.

Irene crosses the street with her advocacy team during Advocacy Day. A former physician, Irene now tells her story of being diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer’s.

Caregiver & Alzheimer's Association Board Member Mikaela Louie speaks with   a staffer from  Sen. Tim Sheldon's office during Advocacy Day.

Caregiver & Alzheimer’s Association Board Member Mikaela Louie speaks with a staffer from Sen. Tim Sheldon’s office during Advocacy Day. “Telling your story is one of the most powerful tools for change. Having the courage to do so is the hard part,” said Mikaela. “This was our second Advocacy Day in a row. We came back because it was such an inspiring and empowering experience the first time.”

Melinda Franklin and Sarah Michael speak to Hannah Britt, staffer for Rep. Judy Clibborn.  "This was my first Advocacy Day," said Melinda.  "I’m so glad I could make it. I'll be here next year too."

Melinda Franklin and Sarah Michael speak to Hannah Britt, staffer for Rep. Judy Clibborn. “This was my first Advocacy Day,” said Melinda. “I’m so glad I could make it. I’ll be here next year too.”

Justine McClure presents the staggering statistics of Alzheimer's disease to Sen. Barbara Bailey's staff.  Alzheimer's disease is the 3rd leading cause of death in Washington State.

Justine McClure presents the staggering statistics of Alzheimer’s disease to Sen. Barbara Bailey’s staff. Alzheimer’s disease is the 3rd leading cause of death in Washington State.

Alice Padilla tells her story of being diagnosed with Alzheimer's to Rep. Judy Clibborn's staff.  "I think there’s got to be more funds," said Alice.  "I’m not angry but there are so many people with this disease.  I was happy I could share my story."

Alice Padilla tells her story of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s to Rep. Judy Clibborn’s staff. “I think there have got to be more funds,” said Alice. “I’m not angry, but there are so many people with this disease. I was happy I could share my story.”

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One comment

  1. […] good: to be making personal connections instead of sending emails or “liking” Facebook posts. (Check out these happy pictures on the Chapter blog site: good feelings all […]

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